Project Spotlight

Nanopore Sequencing

HUIT Supports Cutting-Edge Bioinformatics Research Tools in a Freshman Seminar

January 9, 2017

By Daniel Jamous, Senior Instructional Technologist, Academic Technology for FAS 
In Fall 2016, two HUIT groups – Academic Technology for FAS and the division of IT Support Services responsible for managing Harvard’s computer classrooms – collaborated to provide students with in-class access to cutting-edge bioinformatics research tools.

Academic Technology teams up with History Department, Bok Center, and Harvard Library to offer first Digital Teaching Seminar

Academic Technology teams up with History Department, Bok Center, and Harvard Library to offer first Digital Teaching Seminar

September 3, 2016

On August 29 and 30, HUIT Academic Technology offered its inaugural Digital Teaching Seminar, a two-day interactive event dedicated to providing a hands-on introduction to technologies and technological approaches that are becoming more commonly used in both teaching and research.

Canvas Masters Series small logo

Canvas Masters Series Workshops Are Here!

August 15, 2016

Beginning this fall, Academic Technology for FAS will be offering Canvas training that goes beyond the basics of setting up and administering a course website. Designed as interactive workshops, these topical training sessions will cover more specialized elements of the Canvas learning management system that you may encounter as teaching staff member or course administrator.  

Topics include:

The Rubric feature of the canvas learning management system

Evaluating Project Reports Using Rubrics

November 30, 2015

In Applied Physics 50b, the Rubrics feature in Canvas was instrumental in allowing students to get feedback on their project reports and to submit an improved version based on this feedback.

Applied Physics 50b, which is a new project-based introductory physics course, includes three month-long hands-on projects where students, working in teams, are asked to build physical devices applying the concepts taught in class.

Michael Sandel: Fostering Debate

Michael Sandel: Fostering Debate

February 1, 2012

In his popular courses on Justice and Bioethics, Professor Sandel fostered in-class debate by inviting students to express their opinions about the controversial topics of the course on a blog and to share their arguments and counter-arguments with each other during lectures. The Justice course is now available to the world online at www.justiceharvard.org.

Michael Brenner: Collaborative Problem Sets

Michael Brenner: Collaborative Problem Sets

February 1, 2012

In his course Applied Mathematics 201, Professor Michael Brenner used an innovative approach in his problem set assignments. Students worked in groups of two or three on each assignment. In a first phase, they collaboratively wrote the solution of the problem set and posted it on a wiki. In a second phase, students were asked to study the solution posted by another group and to provide comments to improve the writing and clarity of the solution. Students then voted for the best solution.

Laurel Ulrich: Tangible Things

Laurel Ulrich: Tangible Things

February 1, 2012

In her General Education class, Societies of the World 30: Tangible Things, Professor Ulrich asked her students to look at Harvard history through the prism of more than a hundred tangible objects collected in Harvard museums that were curated and displayed in an exhibit accompanying the course.

Modern Hebrew and iPads

Modern Hebrew and iPads

April 3, 2013

In the fall of 2012, students in second-year Modern Hebrew piloted an iPad project that combined all their handouts, worksheets, exercises, and review materials into a digital format. The goal was to allow students to review materials anywhere at any time, take self-correcting quizzes, review material that could be updated instantly by course staff, bring text files to life with native speakers and pop-up definitions, and make for a much more interactive and enriching experience.

Visualizing the World’s Religions in Multicultural America

Visualizing the World’s Religions in Multicultural America

April 8, 2013

The fall 2011 course, United States in the World 32: The World’s Religions in Multicultural America, explored the dynamic religious landscape of the United States with a special focus on Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist, and Sikh traditions in the most recent period of post-1965 immigration. Students in this course examined the negotiations among civic, constitutional, ethical, and theological issues through the lens of specific cases and controversies.

Excavating the Cultural History of Shanghai

Excavating the Cultural History of Shanghai

April 10, 2013

Shanghai: A Cultural History excavated the cultural and historical memories of Shanghai. With the goal of rendering legible this city’s multiple layers, the course covered topics such as Shanghai’s literary and cinematic representations, architecture and urban spaces, rural migrants and foreign expatriates, everyday life and consumer culture, and Shanghai in wartime and under Socialism.

Project goals included:

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